Cody Pallo
Media Artist
  • Past Projects
  • Honey Dynamite was made mostly to express what I think will be extraordinary uses for AR, VR, and MR once they mature. Although the graphics are more elaborate and whimsical than the content may appear to be, Honey Dynamite is still a great forum to speak about the many exciting ideas I have been having recently.

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  • Newer Industries is my artist name for the music I’ve been making recently. The style is a cross between trap, electronica, and hip-hop. Although I would consider it much like DJ’ing it’s possibly the best musical work I’ve created so far.

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  • Sugar Vision is my first LLC. Although conceived as a creative agency I later decided to turn it into a company that merges my passion for publishing, art, AR,VR, and MR. The company is to eventually release an app called Gallery Visitor. I also created a site of AR, VR, and MR concepts called Honey Dynamite.

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  • Ringin’ Jinkies was perhaps one of my most light hearted projects. It is an idea that incorporated Video, Audio, and Games along with some experiments in other mediums. I created the music, the music video and the interactive work. A friend illustrated the outline of the castle in the game Riddlebrick and wrote the text in the about section.

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  • Groundwork Counsel was my freelance web design and development business. I never actually did business as Groundwork Counsel though. I did however conceive of some great portfolio pieces for work I had done for free. Including the sites and identities for project of family and friends.

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  • Cody Pallo is all my own identity work. I have reinvented myself five times so far, each time quite a bit different then the other. I went from dark to light hearted to elegant all within ten years. This is the work that gets me professional jobs. My last portfolio is what helped me get my Job at Character SF, an amazing branding firm that is responsible for some of the most iconic tech branding I have ever seen. Working there was quite an honor for me.

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  • Harlesby was an attempt to monetize interactive eBooks, an industry that was seeming more and more difficult to make money in. This eBook creation service idea never gained steam. I think because the industry of fully interactive eBooks is not one that has the power to maintain itself. Unfortunately, the cost of development alone is not inline with the demand. This is when I decided to drop the whole idea and pursue other endeavors.

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  • XDP magazine was created in Spring 2013 with the help of a very talented writer friend. Short for Experimental Digital Publishing it was a magazine of interviews with people doing amazing things in the crossover between publishing and experimental art. The magazine was a success in some ways and not so much in others. Financially it was a bust. It was however tweeted about by the media director of the Whitney Museum in NYC and it also gave me an incredible portfolio piece that might possibly be responsible for me getting interviews at both the Getty Museum’s book division and the magazine Dwell. I took the job at Dwell.

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  • The Sugarologists was an offshoot of one of the ideas devised by a writer friend and I in winter 2012. The idea was to create an eBook of artisan candy makers. I liked the concept but after some research I later found that there were too few good companies making unique artisan candy at at the time so I put the project on the back burner.

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  • 2012 was a great year for collaborative ideas. Along with Rubber Acorn, a writer friend and I came up with the idea of making a mail order artisan candy deliver company called Psychic Plum. This idea never gained steam but it later morphed into the Sugarologists, an eBook profiling unique artisan candy makers.

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  • Right after Rubber Acorn was conceived but not quite fully realized, I came up with the idea of Loopy Museum. This site was a place where people could post the most amazing artist created gif’s they could find. I marketed the site to get people to come and was sent a letter by a very famous gif artist calling my attention to the fact that artist weren't being attributed. He suggested a way to find this info and I later created an index of artists. After this I decided the idea might be better suited as an eBook instead so I created a splash site calling for entries.

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  • Rubber Acorn was a big deal to me. In 2012 Apple released an app called Newsstand. Around the same time an open source framework called Baker came out that allowed for the creation of magazines in a format called HPub. Finally there was a medium that allowed for full HTML interactivity. Along with a very talented writer friend, her and I created our first publication XDP in the summer of 2013.

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  • After ArtAcclaim I came up with another social networking idea. This time centered around affiliate eCommerce and reblogging. the idea was to allow people to post their work and then pay a small percentage to people who reblogged it and sold their item. The idea never gained steam but I later revisited it briefly with a concept called Keenbird in 2015.

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  • ArtAcclaim was at first an extension of Burning Turnip, a site I conceived as a full fledged resource for contemporary art in LA. I felt that this concept had so much potential that I decided to make it it’s own thing. The idea was to allow people to post their contemporary art and have it privately critiqued and given “acclaim” so that the best art climbed to the top of visibility. I built the site on a CMS called Pligg. At the time I had to customize it to the extent that it was no longer capable of being updated. At that point I decided to put it on the back burner until I could find another developer to work with. I also contemplated the idea that running an app would be a big undertaking and possibly too limiting.

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  • While being immersed in the world of art blogging I found that there was this new trend of underground art book popup stores coming about. People were publishing a huge variety of print books on the arts. I had always loved zines, this was inspiring to me, so I decided to buy the dot com Zinepub and design this logo for a concept zine distribution site. Although the site was never built, I still to this day like the idea of owning my own physical zine store.

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  • Burning Turnip was the reincarnation of Labelpeel. I decided that the former name didn’t really lend itself to the fun quirky attitude I wanted to pursue. I also decided eBooks were something that needed to mature first as a medium before I would work with them. Burning Turnip ended up becoming an online hub for Chimes&Rhymes and Free Cheesy Sticks. The concept was to be an online contemporary LA art resource. I created an interactive map of LA with gallery locations and recent tweets, a site for art debates and a social network critique site concept that later became ArtAcclaim.

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  • While doing some general development research I stumbled on an old PHP calendar CMS called ExtCalander. I was so inspired by the concept that I created Free Cheesy Sticks, an LA arts events listing site. Later I found that listing every contemporary art event in LA was a huge hassle. Other then being able to be in the know of all the great opening in the area I had found little value and had exhausted my time so I decided to drop it but keep the dot com for use in the future. Once I established Rubber Acorn I made plans to make an eBook of underground Arts event fliers with the same name.

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  • Before the iPad came out I had dreamed of being able to publish websites in a formate that was less temporary. I had just taken a job at a web development firm called Reason after deciding to decline a print design position at Taschen books. Chimes&Rhymes cemented my passion for digital publishing and a new job in Front-End Development reinforced my skills in programming. I read that Apple might be releasing a product that allow for advanced eBook publishing and I quickly established my own company for publishing web art in this new format. When the iPad was released I was the first in a long line of many to buy one. When I entered the Apple Store cameras flashed and I was greeted with applause and congratulations. I remember thinking “this is all quite the gimmick.” Before publishing anything I changed the name from Labelpeel to Burning Turnip and finally to Rubber Acorn.

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  • Around the same time as Utopian Key I discovered the medium of Microblogging. I had been familiar with blogging but never had the desire to write. I knew of Eyebeam’s experiments with reblogging but didn’t know how to accomplish it myself. While working at Gershoni Creative Agency I discovered a platform called Sweetcorn. This medium of posting images was ideal for honing my interest in the arts. I found hundreds of other art blogs to reblog and later moved everything to Tumblr. I blogged for 6 years and still occasionally do. The highlight of this project was my invitation to attend and blog the SFMOMA’s Geneva Anderson and Mark Bradford press event.

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  • In 2002 I was accepted to the Academy of Art University in San Francisco for Industrial Product design. I had designed a few amateur products in the past but didn’t realize what a dangerous practice it was until I started to get hands on with the professional side of it. I decide to pursue another path in multimedia. Although I didn’t continue with my classes, I did maintain a passion for products, specifically novelties. After working as a Graphic / Textile Designer at RedEnvelope and just around the time I started working at Gershoni Creative Agency, I decided to create this tiny arts novelty company. Not all the products I designed were carried through to completion but I had a great time coming up with abstract products that had no other purpose other then to entertain.

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  • In 2007 the highly anticipated Apple iPhone was released. Even before it was, a workshop was established for iPhone online app development. It was hosted at the Adobe building in San Francisco, with plenty of free Red Bulls to accompany it. There I met some great developers from Yelp, Apple, and Google. Everyone was introduced to a tiny unknown site called Twitter. There I created an app for online vector drawing called Splatlab. It never became a fully realized product. I did however spend a good amount of time reading up on the fledgling field of User Experience and also drafted a storyboard and flow chart for the user interface.

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  • Thought Showers was an affiliate store I created that allowed me to curate published work by artists I respected. Although the whole idea of affiliate curated stores never took off, I did have one success. Someone that visited my store purchased a huge amount of eBay merchandise which resulted in $100 in revenue. Although not a giant success it was a lesson in Wordpress development, CSS HTML and JavaScript and establishing an online business.

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  • After making art for quite some time and playing in a few bands myself I decided to try my luck at creating music on my own. A good amount of my time had been dedicated to earning my certification in Media Arts from the School of Media Arts, Santa Barbara. There I took music recording classes from the owner of the recording studio that had done some notable albums by Depeche Mode among others. While reading up on tech news I stumbled on an article on how to make music on an old Nintendo Gameboy. I attempted to get good sound but had some difficulties with the pitch, especially on the first song. Surprisingly, It was rated the highest of my songs on the site Chiptunes Collective.

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  • I developed a passion for art after taking after school private art classes in third grade. In the 90’s I worked long hours on bizarre creative works. During this time I decided to volunteer at a local arts venue called the Contemporary Arts Forum which resulted in my collage work being included in two salon style exhibition events and a short run at a local gallery. Although those were my only exhibitions, I continued to work on art and was later accepted to Art Center College of Design, Pasadena on an art scholarship. After attending Art Center, I was written up on the site Beautiful Decay. At that time, I also decided to change my major to Interactive Design before having to leave due to lack of funds related to the recession.

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  • Loquacity Records was a project I did in high school. It was an underground record label consisting of my friends bands. Every week, if not multiple times a week, I would go to concerts at a venue called the Living Room. Sometimes to see friends bands, sometimes to see larger touring bands. This was my first foray at graphic design. All the graphics that I was responsible for were composed using photocopied assets and hand drawn illustrations.

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  • The Oasis was my first endeavor into the world of business. I was 13 when my lemonade stand was shut down for not having business permits. Instead of fighting the system I worked with it and established a mobile refreshment cart. Because I was in Jr. High I only did this during the summer. Several newspaper articles were written about me which made me kind of a local celebrity in the small town of Ojai, CA.

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Cody Pallo

Cody Pallo is a Media Artist who has long had the dream of merging his love of art, design, technology and business. This has compelled him to constantly search out new avenues of expression. Current Medium is a comprehensive collection of his past projects.